Stinging Nettle

Nettle nettle rich in Iron, good for the blood but you wouldn’t want to lie in them“………

stinging-nettle-urtica-dioica-img

Stinging nettle (Urtica dioica and the closely related Urtica urens) has a long medicinal history. In medieval Europe, it was used as a diuretic (to rid the body of excess water) and to treat joint pain.

Stinging nettle is the name given to common nettle, garden nettle, and hybrids of these plants. Originally from the colder regions of northern Europe and Asia, this herbaceous shrub grows all over the world today. Stinging nettle grows well in nitrogen-rich soil, blooms between June and September, and usually reaches 2 to 4 feet high.

Stems are upright and rigid. Leaves are heart shaped, finely toothed, and tapered at the ends, and flowers are yellow or pink. The entire plant is covered with tiny stiff hairs, mostly on the underside of the leaves and stem, that release stinging chemicals when touched.

Nettle is another plant I take routinely for building blood and relieving allergies. It contains a natural antihistamine so before allergy season ramps up I start taking the Nettle tincture I make. Some plants like Nettle I have found through experience take a little while to build up in the body so it is something you want to give some time to work and stay on it religiously.

Nettle is good for so many things it has become a staple in my herbal medicine chest.

Nettle is high vitamin C and iron content makes it ideal for stimulating red blood cell production.Vitamin C and B12 facilitate the absorption of iron in the gut and iron is a crucial component of blood. By increasing red blood cell production blood circulation increases, oxygenating the extremities better increasing overall energy levels! Therefore Nettle is great for treating anemia.

More Benefits Include:

Early stages of Prostate disease (enlarged prostate)

Natural allergy relief: Can be used for seasonal allergies and asthma.

I use my Nettle tincture heavy for  2 months leading up to spring. If I don’t my allergies are killing me when the cottonwoods start up in May.

Start soaking your nettle tincture NOW so it will be ready by the end of March.

Use the same instructions I used for the sleep tincture.

Place dry nettle in mason jar 1/3 way up. Cover with vodka or brandy to top of jar. Soak 6 weeks minimum because remember its a leaf not a root. Roots take a minimum of 8 weeks. You can use this method for seriously almost any herb or root. Including Turmeric! You will get better absorption of the Turmeric from the powerful strength of the tincture, especially if you add black peppercorns which I do. We use it for headaches, or pain in general. Its very anti-inflammatory and works to prevent cancer as well.

Tea is also a great way to take Nettle.

Back to Nettle

Stimulates Circulation

Helps to prevent Kidney Stones, which I have heard IS HORRIBLE. This can definitely be prevented through dietary choices, soda is not good for preventing kidney stones.

https://www.prevention.com/health/health-concerns/does-soda-cause-kidney-stones

Osteoarthritis,Reduces inflammation, aches and pains.

https://www.arthritis.org/living-with-arthritis/treatments/natural/supplements-herbs/guide/stinging-nettle.php

AND, Interestingly Nettle can help increase the production of breast milk!

Nettle is truly good for so many things and it is claimed to be a general body tonic and very beneficial to all over health.

Another great fact about many of these herbs including Nettle is that they are edible plants. Many people are still foraging wild plants for food. The art of foraging is being brought back and I find it fun and who knows, perhaps it might come in handy one day in the future to have this knowledge. Just a note, when cooked or dried Nettles loose their stinging properties.

http://www.ediblewildfood.com/list-edible-plants-1.aspx

Growing Nettle and these plants in your garden or on your property is wonderful and useful. Nettle doesn’t grow everywhere, so check your areas planting guides to be sure it can thrive without much work. Also, I would keep it away from kids and pets. You dont want them coming in contact with this plant. Care needs to be taken when harvesting and drying Nettle also. Proper clothing and gloves would be highly recommended.

Always check with your doctor if you are on medications before taking any herbal supplements. Nettle can interact with certain drugs such as:

Blood thinners

Blood pressure meds

Diuretics

Lithium

NSAIDs

Sedatives

https://www.organicfacts.net/health-benefits/herbs-and-spices/stinging-nettle.html

stingingnettleinfo

Take good care, Bonnie

 

 

 

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s